Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://lib.jncasr.ac.in:8080/jspui/handle/10572/494
Title: Biochemical Effects of the Porphyrinogenic Drug Allyisopropylacetamide
Authors: Rao, M R S
Padmanaban, Govindarajan
Keywords: Acetamides - pharmacology
Allylisopropylacetamide - pharmacology
Animals
Carbon Radioisotopes
Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System - analysis
Cytochrome Reductases - analysis
Cytochrome c Group - analysis
Female
Heme - biosynthesis
Liver - drug effects
Microsomes
Liver - analysis
Microsomes
Liver - drug effects
Organ Size
Phenobarbital - pharmacology
Phospholipids - analysis
Proteins - analysis
RNA - analysis
Rats
Ribonucleases - analysis
Issue Date: 1973
Publisher: Portland Press
Citation: Biochemical Journal 134(4), 859-868 (1973)
Abstract: Successive administrations of allylisopropylacetamide, a potent porphyrinogenic drug, increase liver weight, microsomal protein and phospholipid contents. There is an increase in the rate of microsomal protein synthesis in vivo and in vitro. The drug decreases microsomal ribonuclease activity and increases NADPH-cytochrome c reductase activity. Phenobarbital, which has been reported to exhibit all these changes mentioned, is a weaker inducer of delta-aminolaevulinate synthetase and increases the rate of haem synthesis only after a considerable time-lag in fed female rats, when compared with the effects observed with allylisopropylacetamide. Again, phenobarbital does not share the property of allylisopropylacetamide in causing an initial decrease in cytochrome P-450 content. Haematin does not counteract most of the biochemical effects caused by allylisopropylacetamide, although it is quite effective in the case of phenobarbital. Haematin does not inhibit the uptake of [2-(14)C]allylisopropylacetamide by any of the liver subcellular fractions.
Description: Restricted Access
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10572/494
Appears in Collections:Research Papers (M.R.S. Rao)

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