Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://lib.jncasr.ac.in:8080/jspui/handle/10572/2483
Title: Simulating natural light and temperature cycles in the laboratory reveals differential effects on activity/rest rhythm of four Drosophilids
Authors: Prabhakaran, Priya M.
Sheeba, Vasu
Keywords: Behavioral Sciences
Neurosciences
Physiology
Zoology
Circadian
Natural
Drosophila
Ananassae
Zaprionus
Circadian Clock
Seminatural Conditions
Locomotor Behavior
Constant Light
Activity Peaks
Fruit-Flies
Melanogaster
Neurons
Mice
Synchronization
Issue Date: 2014
Publisher: Springer
Citation: Prabhakaran, PM; Sheeba, V, Simulating natural light and temperature cycles in the laboratory reveals differential effects on activity/rest rhythm of four Drosophilids. Journal of Comparative Physiology A-Neuroethology Sensory Neural And Behavioral Physiology 2014, 200 (10) 849-862, http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00359-014-0927-x
Journal of Comparative Physiology A-Neuroethology Sensory Neural And Behavioral Physiology
200
10
Abstract: Recent studies under semi-natural conditions have revealed various unique features of activity/rest rhythms in Drosophilids that differ from those under standard laboratory conditions. An additional afternoon peak (A-peak) has been reported for Drosophila melanogaster and another species D. malerkotliana while D. ananassae exhibited mostly unimodal diurnal activity. To tease apart the role of light and temperature in mediating these species-specific behaviours of four Drosophilid species D. melanogaster, D. malerkotliana, D. ananassae, and Zaprionus indianus we simulated gradual natural light and/or temperature cycles conditions in laboratory. The pattern observed under semi-natural conditions could be reproduced in the laboratory for all the species under a variety of simulated conditions. D. melanogaster and D. malerkotliana showed similar patterns where as D. ananassae consistently exhibited predominant morning activity under almost all regimes. Z. indianus showed clearly rhythmic activity mostly when temperature cycles were provided. We find that gradually changing light intensities reaching a sufficiently high peak value can elicit A-peak in D. melanogaster, D. malerkotliana, and D. ananassae even at mild ambient temperature. Furthermore, we show that high mid-day temperature could induce A-peak in all species even under constant light conditions suggesting that this A-peak is likely to be a stress response.
Description: Restricted Access
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10572/2483
ISSN: 0340-7594
Appears in Collections:Research Papers (Udaykumar Ranga)

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