Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://lib.jncasr.ac.in:8080/jspui/handle/10572/1198
Title: A Comparative study of the magnetic properties and phase separation behavior of the rare earth cobaltates, Ln0.5Sr0.5CoO3 (Ln = rare earth)
Authors: Kundu, Asish
Sarkar, R
Pahari, B
Ghoshray, A
Rao, C N R
Keywords: Mossbauer spectroscopy
Itinerant-Electron Ferromagnetism
Cation Size-Disorder
Transport-Properties
La1- Xsrxcoo3
System
Pr
Gd
Nd
Issue Date: Apr-2007
Publisher: Academic Press Inc Elsevier Science
Citation: Journal of Solid State Chemistry 180(4), 1318-1324 (2007)
Abstract: A comparative study of the magnetic properties of a few members of the Ln(0.5)Sr(0.5)CoO(3) family with different radii of the A-site cations, 〈rA〉, in the range 1.19-1.40 A has been carried out. The apparent Tc (where the magnetization undergoes an abrupt increase) decreases markedly with 〈rA〉 as well as the size-disorder arising from the mismatch in the size of the A-site cations. The value of the magnetization at low temperatures decreases markedly with decrease in〈rA〉 or increase in size-disorder, suggesting that the relative proportion of the ferromagnetic (FM) species decreases relative to that of the paramagnetic (PM) species. Such a variation of the FM/ PM ratio with composition and temperature is evidenced from the Mossbauer spectra of La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 as well. The variation of the FM/PM ratio with 〈rA〉 and size-disorder, as well as a local-probe study using Co-59 Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy suggest that electronic phase separation is an inherent feature of the Ln(0.5)Sr(0.5)CoO(3) type cobaltates, with the nature of the different magnetic species in the phase-separated system varying with 〈rA〉 and size disorder. (c) 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Description: Restricted Access
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10572/1198
Other Identifiers: 0022-4596
Appears in Collections:Research Papers (Prof. C.N.R. Rao)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
2007.39.pdf
  Restricted Access
305.65 kBAdobe PDFView/Open Request a copy


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.